Bass Andrew Robert Munn completed his graduate studies at The Juilliard School in May 2018. The same spring, he debuted with Opera Theatre of Saint Louis as Doctor Grenvil in Verdi's La Traviata, Specialist Swanson in the world premiere of Huang Ruo's An American Soldier, and starred as Seneca in Berlin OperFest’s production of Monteverdi’s L’Incoronazione di Poppea. As featured soloist and librettist, he is collaborating with Rome Prize winning composer Nina C. Young on Making Tellus, an operatic exploration of humanity's relationship to the Earth, commissioned by the Koussevitzky Fund at The Library of Congress. He is based in Berlin.

Mr. Munn made his Lincoln Center debut with Juilliard Opera under the direction of Laurence Cummings in Handel's Agrippina, performing the role of Lesbo and covering Claudio in 2017. Additional Juilliard opera credits include performing Dr. Cajus and covering Falstaff in Die Lustigen Weiber von Windsor by Otto Nicolai and Parque in Stephen Wadsworth’s production of Hypollite et Aricie. In 2016 he appeared as Sarastro in Mozart’s Die Zauberflöte and the Lion in Oliver Knussen’s Higglety Pigglety Pop! at Bard College and debuted as a Young Artist with Bel Canto at Caramoor, covering Rocco and singing the Second Prisoner in Beethoven’s Fidelio under Pablo Heras-Casado and Il Pastore in Rossini’s Aureliano in Palmira under Will Crutchfield. In 2015, Mr. Munn joined the Aspen Opera Theater Center as Beethoven for the world stage premiere of Steven Stucky and Jeremy Denk’s opera The Classical Style.

In concert, Mr. Munn has performed Mozart’s Requiem under the baton of Ádám Fischer, Haydn’s Die Schöpfung with the American Symphony Orchestra under Leon Botstein, Handel’s Messiah with Mr. Botstein’s The Orchestra Now, Rossini’s Stabat Mater with The Orchestra of the Triangle, and Jesus in Bach’s Johannes Passion with Cathedral of All Saints and Handel and Haydn Society. He debuted at Merkin Concert Hall in New York Festival of Song's acclaimed program of politically inspired music, Protest! with pianist Steven Blier in February 2018. He was a Vocal Fellow at the Tanglewood Music Center in 2017, where he was featured as a soloist in Bach's Liebster Jesu mein Verlangen conducted by John Harbisonexcerpts from Heinrich Schütz's Symphonaie Sacrae, and recitals curated by Stephanie Blythe and Dawn Upshaw. Under the mentorship of Ms. Upshaw and Sanford Sylvan, Mr. Munn performed Schubert’s Winterreise and other lieder programs with his duo partner Rami Sarieddine.

Mr. Munn works with composers and interdisciplinary artists to create works that shed light on the interrelationship of human and natural systems. As featured soloist and librettist, he is collaborating with Rome Prize winning composer Nina C. Young on Making Tellus, an operatic exploration of humanity's relationship to the Earth, commissioned by the Koussevitzky Fund at The Library of Congress. Mr. Munn’s work as a performer, librettist, and co-producer of these works represent his conviction that in addition to an artist's aesthetic responsibilities, artists play a vital role in connecting the public to forces greater than ourselves; be they geologic, divine, political, ecological, or personal.

These convictions are born of Mr. Munn’s work as a community organizer for climate justice from 2007 to 2014. During this time, he worked with communities in West Virginia to oppose mountaintop removal coal mining and to place local environmental issues in the context of climate change and globalized capitalism. His work on land reform, economic transition in coal-dependent areas, and civil disobedience was published and analyzed in The Journal of Appalachian Studies and Applied Anthropology; books published by Punctum, AK, and Atlantic Monthly Presses; and was featured in documentaries including The Last Mountain and Battle for Blair Mountain on CNN.

Mr. Munn completed his undergraduate studies in voice at the University of Michigan. He first found his love of music as a chorister in the music program of State College Area High School in Pennsylvania.